Lightheart



Adventures

059: Balancing Disability & Entrepreneurship with Sara Thompson, creator of the Combat Wheelchair

 

Today, I have the absolute pleasure to introduce you to Sara Thompson. Sara is most widely known for the Combat Wheelchair they created for D&D, but she is also a freelance game designer working with companies like Paizo and R Talsorian Games. We definitely talk about Sara’s game design processes, but this episode is extra special to me because we spend time talking about disability and working as a freelancer with your disabilities. Those of you who’ve listened to episodes of this show in past will know that I’m disabled and went through a lot of unpleasant things last year while trying to figure out entrepreneurship, so it was really meaningful to chat with Sara and learn how she manages her day to day schedule and how they balance varying energy levels and flare-ups with deadlines as a freelancer. I really hope you enjoy this very special conversation.

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

Time Stamps

  • 00:00:00 Introduction & Updates
  • 00:02:23 Sara Introduction
  • 00:06:25 Updating the Combat Wheelchair
  • 00:11:45 Freelancing with ttrpg companies
  • 00:17:54 Sara’s design processes
  • 00:30:01 If you could design for any game, what would it be?
  • 00:36:25 Balancing disability with being a freelancer
  • 00:47:09 Dealing with internalized ableism and finding acceptance
  • 00:55:54 Upcoming projects
  • 01:03:13 Where can people find you?
  • 01:06:12 Wrap-up

Find Sara:

Show Affiliates / Some of Courtney's favorite things

  • FloDesk Easily create gorgeous emails. Get your 1st month free & 50% off for your first year.

  • Found Familiar Delicious coffee meets Dungeons & Dragons artwork. Use code lightheartadv for 10% off your order.

  • Friday Afternoon Tea Grab a cup of tea with blends based on your favorite nerdy series. Use lightheartadv for 10% off

  • Dice Envy creates beautiful dice in a variety of materials. Use lightheartadv for 10% off your order

  • Buzzsprout is my fabulous podcast host! Try it for free & receive a $20 Amazon gift card if you sign up.

Transcript

Courtney:

Hello & Welcome to Episode 59 of Roll Play Grow, the podcast for tabletop entrepreneurs, creators, and fans. I am Courtney Stover of Lightheart Adventures, and in this podcast, we talk to the creators behind the brands in the tabletop roleplay gaming space about who they are and how they are turning their passion for gaming into a career. 

Today, I have the absolute pleasure to introduce you to Sara Thompson. Sara is most widely known for the Combat Wheelchair they created for D&D, but she is also a freelance game designer working with companies like Paizo and R Talsorian Games. We definitely talk about Sara’s game design processes, but this episode is extra special to me because we spend time talking about disability and working as a freelancer with your disabilities. Those of you who’ve listened to episodes of this show in past will know that I’m disabled and went through a lot of unpleasant things last year while trying to figure out entrepreneurship, so it was really meaningful to chat with Sara and learn how she manages her day to day schedule and how they balance varying energy levels and flare ups with deadlines as a freelancer. I really hope you enjoy this very special conversation.

For those of you who are new to Roll Play Grow, welcome! This podcast is a part of Lightheart Adventures, which is a small company I co-founded with my husband. We also do blogs, free one-shots, and maps that you’ll find over on our website, lightheartadventures.com. This podcast updates on Fridays, and I get to chat with so many amazing folks across a wide spectrum of industries within the TTRPG scene, so be sure to subscribe to Roll Play Grow on your favorite podcast player. I’ve got some absolutely AMAZING guests coming up, and you will not want to miss them! And if you like what you’re hearing, I’d love it if you would drop me a review on your favorite podcast player.

Alright, that’s enough of a preamble, so please enjoy this conversation with Sara.

Courtney: 

Hello friends. I am joined now by disability consultant, writer, and game designer, sarah Thompson. Hello, Sarah, how are you today?

Sara: 

Hi. I’m good. Thank you. Very cold in England, but that’s, you know, the usual so yeah, cold, but getting on with it.

Courtney: 

Do you ever have times that are like, it’s actually warm on a consistent basis in this month?

Sara: 

Last year it was pretty good. We had like a whole like summer where it was just pleasantly warm and no, it, it hasn’t happened this summer, so yeah, take, take what you can get. Really.

Courtney: 

Yeah, I’ve only had a couple days that I would say were warm so far out in the Seattle area. And I grew up where it used to be hot all the time, so I don’t miss like the extreme heat, but I do miss the sun. I would like sun

Sara: 

Yeah, that’s fair.

Courtney: 

Well, Sarah to kick things off: can you tell us a bit about yourself and how you got into gaming?

Sara: 

Yeah. So as you said, I’m a disability consultant and also a game designer and writer. And I’ve been doing that since I was 23 now. So two years and first did a home brew, which was the combat wheelchair for fifth edition, Dungeons and dragons. And I touched on TTRPGs back in high school, probably I would say around about like 14 when we played fourth edition at D&D and didn’t have a great time with it. Kind of was the only femme person at the table playing a, a female character. And she just got made into like a damsel in distress, like kind of demoted to that. And I was like, this is like terrible. If this is what Dungeons and Dragons is. And then I had a partner in sixth form, which, for people who, who aren’t British, like that’s your two years before you go to university. my partner was like, oh, do you want to play Dungeons and Dragons? Fifth edition came out very easy to pick up, should be a lot of fun. And I was like, yeah, I don’t know about that. I had like a really bad experience. And then I did a one shot where it was just me playing and then DMing. And it was a great time and I really enjoyed it. And then we did Curse of Starahd with a couple of friends before going to university. And I was like, yeah, Dungeons Dragons is fun. Like, this is fun. This is what it’s meant to be, clearly. And from there, like it kind of just devolved into, you know, falling into the traps of like other TTRPGs and you know, growing my bookshelf with a lot of books that I now have. And yeah. And then in final year of university, put the combat wheelchair out and then straight out of university and into writing for tabletop games. So yeah, it’s, it’s all been kind of happening rapid fast now, the past couple of years, but it’s been really fun.

Courtney: 

Yeah. What are you playing these days?

Sara: 

A lot of Star Wars TTRPG, both the FFG system. And I’ve also played with the fifth edition hack system that they came up with both are really fun. I’m more of an FFG fan, just cuz I like the certain mechanics of that better. Like the light and dark side dice. I think those are just really fun. And also the Witcher table top game as well which I’ve managed to grab and drag my friends into and made them, you know, like enjoy the Witcher and start playing the video games and read the books and watch the show and, and like, yes, I pulled you into it with me. So yeah, getting, getting to play that a lot as well. And. It probably over the last few months, they’ve kind of been a bit too busy with work to play table top. But yeah, other than like a weekly D&D game that I play in now, it’s usually, if I get invited to like, guest on something or be in a one shot with a couple of friends, with whatever system they’re playing in, then yeah. I’ll usually just like hop in because it’s just fun.

Courtney: 

Yeah. I get that. It’s hard to manage, being able to play for fun when you’re also trying to like, work with the product, but

Sara: 

yeah. Yeah.

Courtney: 

yeah. that’s cool though. So you, did the first version of the combat wheelchair when you were finishing up university, and so one thing that I’ve kind of wondered is that I know that you have three versions of the combat wheelchair out and you’re working on a fourth. It seems like as soon as you publish one version, you’re already working on the next version. Is that, is that right?

Sara: 

Yeah. Usually like I’ll, I’ll publish out a new version and then I usually take a couple of weeks. And in that time, you know I’ve got to reread over it after like a week or so, or whatever away and come back to it with fresh eyes and I’m like, oh, here’s some like new ideas. And it’s either new ideas I’ve thought of while playing D&D or running it with friends. Or it could just be that I was reading a completely different TTRPG system. And I’m like, I want that. And then I’m gonna make it an upgrade. Or even if it’s just watching a TV show and I’m like, I want that to be a, an upgrade for the chair. That would be fun. And you know, taking inspiration from random places. So yeah, like I usually give it a few weeks and then I’m like, oh, I like, I’ve got another idea for it now. And. Yeah, stuff like that. Like this time around with the fourth edition, adding feats and a fighting style for specifically the combat wheelchair and things like that. And also just refining more niche areas of the rulings just to make things a bit more clearer or more streamlined if I found a better way to, to write them. So yeah, it’s usually a lot of coming back to it with fresh eyes and then I’m like, yeah, this is, you know, something new that I could bring to the table or add to it. But yeah, it does really does seem like it’s like every couple months, like I’ve started writing the new manuscript and after straight after publishing but yeah. It’s been, it’s been fun. it’s a nice consistent project to return back to in between writing, whether it be official stuff or just stuff for other systems.

Courtney: 

That makes sense. And it is cool that you can keep iterating on it and getting new, cool things like built into it. how much would you say that the base mechanics have changed over the last three versions?

Sara: 

A lot. Yeah. Like a lot, a lot. There were just, even if it’s just small things like the, only thing that I would say has consistently stayed the same are like your three base optional attacks that you can use instead of a weapon while you’re in the chair. And those are like the only things that have stayed consistently the same. And then everything else has kind of just been expanded upon like the rulings for the beacon stones, like they used to have a limited amount that they could move up or downstairs. And I was like, well, that’s, that’s stupid. Cuz of the characters who are able bodied, don’t have to do that. Like they don’t have to stop halfway downstairs. So I was like, no, you can just go up and downstairs. And now it also includes ladders and anything that is, you know, like an ascending or descending platform that you can do, and then as I researched into more different sports and different styles of wheelchairs, I was like, okay, yeah, you can climb in it. You can swim in it. As long as you are aware of how much you are carrying on the chair and how much that weight is gonna affect your character and things like that. And then even adding the optional rulings for what happens if you drop from like a really great height with like full damage. And that kind of thing. Just for people who play a bit more like crunchy roles, I guess. So yeah, getting, getting to do that and then. A lot of, yeah, like the, the whole upgrades. There wasn’t a lot of them. I don’t think that came in until the second version of the chair, like upgrades and stuff. And now, you know, to get to, to fourth version and there are now like at least a whole, a whole catalog’s worth of upgrades and all of them do different things. And then by third edition, which is the most recent one, that was the one that introduced a subclass for every class that is focused on either disability in some way, or incorporating the wheelchair, but you don’t have to use the wheelchair in order to be a subclass of that type. So yeah, getting to, yeah, it’s, it’s come like a really long way. since the first version Yeah. And then also adding in, I think in the second version as well, that it’s the extension of yourself feature, which is you can transform with you and you use transmutation magic. And then I recently put in, in, I think it is in the third version or maybe the fourth version, but there’s a clause now that’s like, it also changes if you’re affected by anthropy, it’s subjected to the same stuff. And now in the fourth version, it’s no longer just a wheelchair anymore. Like I’ve talked about, you know, that there’s gonna be prosthetics and other mobility devices in like a catalog in the back. Like you can refer to so that even if you don’t use a wheelchair, you can use these mobility aids instead. And some of them also function as weapons and things like that. So it’s been, yeah, it’s, it’s kind of wild to watch it grow, like from the fact that it was at most like three pages long, and now it’s a solid document. That’s like over a hundred pages. And that’s not including like putting the artwork in and stuff like that. So yeah, it’s, it’s become like this whole big thing now.

Courtney: 

Okay. I am even more excited than I was for the fourth edition now with like, yeah. The other, like the prosthetics and other devices. That’s gonna be super cool. okay. Well, I know you have talked about the chair a lot lots and lots of interviews. So what I would like to pivot to then is kinda just going over the timeline of your TTRPG career, so you put the first edition out while you were still in university, but then talk to me about, you know, like how and when you got involved with doing more disability consultant and working on the Witcher and all of those fun things.

Sara: 

So yeah, by the time the, the second version came out was when I’d graduated that summer. Or while when I’d finished, because we hadn’t been able to go to graduation until this year because COVID um, Yep. But by that point I had kind of done a bit of networking here and there, and I’d done some sensitivity reading for other people’s like smaller projects. by around January, before the second version came out, I’d networked and become friends with people from R Talsorian Games. And I got invited to be on a Witcher charity, one shot stream. And I got to play one of my characters who’s a bard called Ren and she has a prosthetic leg. And yeah, getting to play her was a lot of fun. And then I brought the second version of the chair out in the, in the summer of that year and pretty much kind of straight after I graduated, R Talsorian reached out and like, Hey, we are having slots open where people can submit writing applications. And if you’re interested, like this is what you need to do. And they were like, you only need to write like a one or two page short, like adventure, one shot. I turned in a 12 page. one shot cuz I just got too into it. And yeah, they, then I, I got a position writing for them freelancing on the first thing with them, which was a book of tales and I got to write my first official adventure which is like, it was a proper beast of an adventure as well. Like there were like nearly 30 NPCs in it and all of them were different and like they all had to have like different backs stories and motivations and things. So that was a lot of fun. And during that time People from Paizo reached out and were like, Hey, we really like version two of the combat wheelchair. Could you do something like that for Starfinder and Pathfinder? And I worked on that with them and did the Lost Omens Grand Bazaar, which is for Pathfinder 2E. And it has like a whole shop called Morhans Mobility A pparel. And it’s a completely like accessible, shop with a disabled ShopKeep called Morhan who like makes and also sells a lot of mobility devices. And I got to do that. And then that kind of turned into working on a bunch of other things, like the Hellboy role playing game. And I got to. Basically do like a sort of field guide for disabled agents from the BPRD. And then then I also got to do an adventure with them. And then on top of that, then people from SteamForge reached out and I got to work on Bardsong, which was really cool because there were people like Matt Mercer who worked on that writing an adventure and things like that. So that was really exciting. And then I got brought back to R Talsorian games cuz they wanted to work on Cyberpunk Red and I got to bring in cyber chairs, wheelchairs, and we also canonized a motorable team in night city. So that was really fun. then I also got brought back onto the Witcher again and got to write the the adventure for the magic supplement, which was Tome of Chaos. And that time when I spoke with them I said, I have an idea and I would like to talk about ableism and disability in the Witcher, but put it into an adventure and have it be the focus of the adventure. And they were really supportive of it. And then I got to write that, and it was my first adventure writing, you know, something where ableism is presented as the bad thing it is. And you know, that the people who committed that, that act that had a knock on effect they aren’t portrayed to be sympathetic at all. Like you’re not supposed to like sympathize with them. And it was really kind of cathartic and nice to write that because before I’d only written in the Book of Tales because they were like, oh, we have this adventure idea. We need you to write it, which was how they, they laid it out that time. And I got to write in some disabled NPCs which was really great and fun. But then to write a whole adventure where like, it was all centered on, on this like one core thing, especially like considering you know, how the Witcher really helped me with my own internalized ableism and disability and acceptance of that that, yeah, like I, the fact that I got to do that was just really cool. And now I’m kind of just jumping around from place to place working on projects and even smaller things if it’s just like editing now, like I do help with writing, editing, and consultations on projects and stuff, so yeah, it’s, it’s It’s all kind of happened quickly. And from having talked to other people in the industry, I understand that like my experience of it was very much an out outlier and is not really considered the norm where like all of a sudden you get loads of like job offerings and stuff. Which is why it’s hard when people are like, oh, what, what do you suggest people do that, that wanna get into the industry? And I’m like, I, I dunno what to tell you, because like, what happened with me was just very specific and had like a knock on effect and was very much luck based, which I understand it is as well, but it’s also like a lot of hard work for a lot of people normally. So yeah, like it’s, it’s always stumped me when people are like, oh, like tell us. How, how you would do this or like get into working. And I’m just like a lot of what I did was very much luck. And yeah, like it’s, it’s, it’s been a wild time. But it’s been really fun and I’ve got to meet a lot of cool people and work on some really cool projects as well.

Courtney: 

I mean, I knew that you had worked on a lot of different games and been able to start consulting and contributing. But it’s just really cool to hear how much and the variety of the different systems that you’ve been able to work on so far.

Sara: 

Yeah. Yeah. It’s just been a lot more than I thought I was gonna get to work on already. So yeah.

Courtney: 

Fair enough. One thing that I love to really dig into is processes, so when it comes to, and I realize, I should say as a caveat that like, it’s gonna be different if you’re just making, like, an NPC, that’s part of a larger adventure versus writing like the whole adventure yourself, but just kind of generally, how do you approach projects? Like what are the different, like processes or thoughts that you’re kind of going through as you’re working on each of these things?

Sara: 

Yeah I usually like read through like the whole core rule book. usually like a good example with that was when I got invited onto working for the Witcher. And I was familiar with the rules, but I wanted to make sure I got like a good read on everything. So getting to go through all of that. And I put a picture of it on Instagram and people were like, I can’t believe you do that. But like I have my books open and I’ll write on the book, like in the book. And that’s just a thing from, I guess, you know, doing an English degree, literature degree that you just kind of scroll in the book and it’s fine. And so I’ll, I’ll normally like note things like this needs changing, or I could think of a fun way to use this specific rule that normally wouldn’t come up. And it’s kind of just there, just in case, like I could make it a fun core mechanic. Yeah, like it’s, it’s hard to explain my process really, cuz I’m just like, I’ll, I’ll pick like an idea that I really like and just run with it and then see how I can make it fit into the game that I’m using or like telling the story with So like with adventures like with the Witcher one where I had the idea of, I wanna write something with ableism as the core thing. And I basically just went through on like a binge of the Witcher stuff that I’ve got including the books and stuff, and kind of went through and looked at disabled characters and like where, where the faults were in their representation. And I also reread Amanda Leduc’s Disfigured, which is on, on fairy tales and disability. And they talk about basically how ableism and fairytales goes hand in hand. And I was like, well, in a setting like the Witcher where fairytales are actually history, like that’s important that it would come up. And how could I then figure this out and apply it. So yeah, I got to, to write the whole story of essentially you see it a lot in, in fairy tales where like they trade something in order for something else. So it was like a trade off was like the premise where a baby was born disabled and the parents more concerned of like what everybody else would think of them. And this disabled child is they summoned a demon and swapped and said like, we want a quote unquote like normal, healthy child, you know? And that brings upon them like this curse, and it curses the child that they got in return, which isn’t fair to that child because that child wasn’t involved really in what the parents did. And yet it begins to affect their life far more than a child with disability would’ve and that’s kind of the, the core message that I really wanted to, to give is like, yeah, these people are despicable and I’m really tired of fairy tales, making them out to be empathetic and sympathetic. Like you shouldn’t feel bad for them. So, yeah, getting to, to do that was like a really cathartic and fun process. And yeah, getting. As well is when you work on projects like that, you usually get a head writer or somebody from the company that you’re working with, who bounces the ideas with you. And just basically, you know, makes sure that you’re staying on track in terms of writing and is there to help. So like I got to bounce ideas with someone who worked with me which is James and he’s one of the lead writers on the, the, the books now. So getting to bounce ideas with him and being like, this is the core message. I want the story to tell how can we make sure that this stays the core message? So yeah, getting to, to do that. Even if it’s like I’ll also like rewatch things as well. Like depending on, like I said, like with the game that I’m doing or like working on for example, like it’s a personal project at the minute, but working on disability stuff for Star Wars. So like I’ll go through and like rewatch things and pick the good stuff and the bad stuff. So like, this is the stuff that should be involved in this project, and this is the stuff that should be involved, but used as an example to point out why it’s bad and why you shouldn’t do that. So yeah, it, it really varies depending on who I’m working for and what it is that I’m trying to do. But a lot of the time it’s just like scribbling down random notes and ideas, and then kind of coming back to it at some point and being like, okay, how can I put these ideas together until they form a coherent story or form a rule set that makes sense. And I’ve talked about it before, but working on the combat wheelchair, like cuz I was in university as I would go and make use of the university library and study disabled sports and disability. And go through and like read all these books and take them out as well. And yeah, then like pick ideas and things that I think would translate over very well in D&D. So like with the combat wheelchair I was like, so sports wheelchairs specifically, like motorable chairs would translate over great to a combat setting because if you watch Murderball, it’s all like high impact, high speed. It’s it’s shocking that nobody gets seriously injured very often because of how intense it is. And I was like, yeah, that would work great for combat. Because combat is those things, especially in D&D So getting to take those ideas and being like, okay, how can I translate this over with numbers and rules and how can I make it work? And then on top of that, you then have the, okay, well, what if a DM wants to do this? Or what if a player does this? And then you’re like, okay, now I’ve gotta keep going back to the chalkboard and adding in like little episodes of like, if your player does this, this is what you have to do. And yeah, it’s, it is a lot of going to, and from like the, the metaphorical whiteboard really, and like picking things up and then sometimes realizing that even if you really like an idea that you might have to scrap it and like, because it might work better on something else, like, it’s good for this, but like, it doesn’t work too great. So like, you know, change it over for another project which is why I’ve now been like I wanna put prosthetics and other mobility aids into the combat wheelchair rule set, because now I can take the ideas that didn’t work great for the chair and put them here instead and have like really fun things go on here. So yeah, it’s very much my creative process, I guess, is kind of really scattered when I describe it to people and I’m like, but it makes sense when I’m working on it, it’s, it’s one of those things where like, I’ll, I’ll fixate on like one specific area for a really long time. And then my brain will get like, oh, but this is, this is a fun idea as well. And then I’ll be like, okay now to fixate on that for the next couple of days and keep bouncing between things. And then coming back and revisiting them, like you said about taking a couple weeks and then like immediately going onto the next version. It’s yeah, that’s kind of my, like a lot of my creative process is like, I’ll leave things alone for a while, come back and then be like, ah, here’s all these fun, new ideas I’ve collected since then. And here’s how I can now apply them. But as you get more involved with and used to using a system like it becomes a lot easier. I’ve found to just like make up rules. And usually they get through play testing pretty easily because you kind of can gauge, okay, this doesn’t sound overpowered anymore. And like, I won’t have to put too many rulings on it because I can kind of you know, put it against something else I made in the past and be like, yeah, like this, this now works like kind of from the get go. So yeah, the, the process definitely becomes easier, I think, as well as you get more used to writing for different TTRPGs. Like you, you tend to get more direct with your creative process or have a creative process. Like, like I’ve said that like really works for me, but when I explain it to other people, they’re like, I dunno how you get anything done. because I’m all over the place.

Courtney: 

How do you decide? know? However you wanna say it, that you are like, done, like you’re ready to publish it, or you’re ready to send it off to the editor. Like, cause I know a lot of designers and artists out there will struggle with like, oh, I just, I have to fix one more thing, but like, oh, but now I have to fix that thing. So how do you just tell yourself to stop, move on?

Sara: 

Usually when I’m, when I feel like I’ve become too fixated on it, if I feel like I’ve been kind of staring at the project now for a while. And all the changes I’m making are like, so minute, like, especially if they’re just things like word changes and it’s like, that can be done after play testing or after somebody else has read through it and checked it over. I’m still really bad though with writing for the Witcher and knowing when to stop. Because I get really fixated on the idea and like, so usually people like James have been like, we’ll, we’ll take it off you for now and pass it on to the play tester. And once you get your feedback, then you can have it back. And even, even then, while it’s in play testing, I’ll still have the draft with me and be like, I, I need to change this. And I wanna add that and see, see what sticks. But that’s, that’s, that’s one of the outliers where like, That’s one of just like the TTRPGs, I guess when people ask about like, what’s your favorite one to work on? Like the Witcher is definitely that because it just scratches a very specific itch in my Witcher loving brain whenever I get to work on it and it’s just a lot of fun. But yeah, definitely. With the combat wheelchair in particular, if, if it’s not making me happy while I’m working on it, then I’m like, yeah, it needs to go off to somebody else with a fresh pair of eyes for them to look at it, because it might just be me that’s seeing faults that only I would really notice and not anyone else. And that’s usually the case is like, my friend will send it back and be like, yeah, you’re just being stupid. I’m like, thanks. thanks. Yeah. You’re just, you’re just overthinking again. And I’m like, thank you. But yeah, getting and making sure you have people who are like, happy to tell you that and put a foot down with you because otherwise I’m one of those people who would cling onto writing the version for as long as possible to the point where I’m not pleased with it, no matter how it would be published which with version four at the minute, like I’m really pleased to say that that hasn’t happened. But when I was writing version three and doing all of the subclasses was a nightmare because no matter what, I wasn’t pleased with every subclass and not every subclass is gonna be fantastic because I noticed the sub classes I really liked and enjoyed were all for classes that I really enjoy playing in D&D. So like they, of course they felt great to me because it’s like, yeah, this is what I would want out of a ranger. And this is what I would want out of a rogue. But then, you know, I gave my Paladin subclass to a friend who loves to play Paladins. And they were like, yeah, this is great. This is what I want out of a Paladin. And I’m like, oh, cuz I thought it kind of sucked, but apparently not. So yeah, getting to, make sure that you’re seeing it from other people’s perspectives on a project is definitely really important. Because otherwise, yeah, you, you just would never get anything published or maybe that’s just me!

Courtney: 

No, no, I, I, I think that’s a pretty good advice okay. 

Courtney: 

So I actually have a patron question that I wanna make sure that I ask before we switch to totally different topic, which is, is there any system that you haven’t written for that you would like to write for whether that’s, you know, bringing a version of the combat wheelchair to it or something else? Like any games out there that you wanna write for

Sara: 

Star Wars, please. Like I’ve,

Courtney: 

yeah.

Sara: 

mentioned it a couple times on Twitter. I’m like, yeah, that would, that would be the dream like is to, to bring cuz star Wars does have a lot of great stuff in terms of disability representation, but it’s so often written by people who aren’t disabled and suffers a lot of the pitfalls of that, where I’m for example, like the biggest one for me is Darth beta. And the fact that his suit is deliberately poorly designed to keep him in pain. The pain keeps him angry, and the anger makes him hurt people. And I’m just like, thank you, George Lucas, for that. As much as I love Star Wars, thank you for that. But, but then on the other hand, one of the villains that I’m like, is a great disabled villain is Darth Maul because he just happens to be disabled and a villain. Like like they could have gone the whole route of him hating Obi Wan because Obi Wan, you know, chopped him in half, but he hates Obi Wan because Obi Wan was a Padawan and he beat him and that’s like, that hurt his pride. And yeah, so, so getting to, to see that be the character was like really refreshing when I watched Clone Wars because I was like, oh my goodness, finally, a villain who isn’t evil because he’s disabled, he’s just evil and disabled which is how it should be if you’re gonna do that. So getting to I think work on Star Wars would be great. Like there are a lot of concepts and stuff at the minute that are kind of lacking in the game, but are there in like different media sources from Star Wars, like bad batch with Echo and the fact that he uses his prosthetics to like slice into computer mainframes and can also dismantle like droids and stuff with it and also uses it as a weapon. I love, I love Echo, like, he’s my favorite one, but he’s, he’s like a really good disabled character. And the fact that he still carries trauma, because one of the interesting things about his character is he was on a planet essentially, was captured, tortured and fitted with cybernetics and robotic parts against his will. And like the trauma of adjusting to that and adjusting to life with a disability that he either didn’t know was coming- like some disabled people are aware that it’s a possibility for them, that it then affects their later life. And also him not consenting to it as well, and that’s interesting for a character. But it’s never portrayed in a way where he’s like, oh, I hate my life and it’s not worth anything. It’s him adjusting to that. And still realizing that he is as much a person as anyone else. And like, that is such a good message. I think, especially as somebody who, whose, you know, disability came abruptly at age 12 and like, I hadn’t really had any warning. But looking back on it now, obviously the warning signs were there, but none of us knew. So like, you know, I can kind of relate to just abruptly one day, you are disabled now and having to adjust to that and knowing that I couldn’t do things that other kids could anymore. And you know, it makes you feel like an outlier, like an outsider essentially. And seeing a character who had that kind of same progression of just like one day wakes up and he now has cybernetic limbs and you know, talks about the pain of having those things because chronic pain, as well as the emotional trauma that it does as well. And yet having a support group around him who treats him as a person and, you know, reminds him that those feelings are absolutely valid and it doesn’t make you any less of a person for feeling that way is great. And it’s also another reason why I’m like, like no Clone Wars and Bad Batch. Aren’t just like, kids’ cartoons. Like, you know, as an adult, you can get so much enjoyment out of them as well because of how specific the storytelling is and getting to see disabled characters like that, with those stories where their stories, aren’t just, you know, pity parties essentially, where they’re made out to be the sad person all the time. It’s really validating. And it’s great to see that that’s happening more now. And that we’re seeing, especially like, I don’t know if it’s just me, but seeing more of it in Star Wars is just really cool. Like when the Mandalorian came out and the Tuscan Raiders have sign language and it was actually invented by somebody who worked on the Mandalorian who’s deaf and uses sign language. So like the sign language actually was a sign language. It wasn’t just: sometimes you see people just throw up random hand gestures and claim it as a sign language without realizing the nuances of different gestures. Cuz even how far you hold out your hands from your body indicates the volume and intensity that you’re signing with. And yeah, getting to see that in the Mandalorian was great. Like I was like, oh my God, it’s an actual sign language. Cuz I did linguistics as part as my degree, and I was watching it and I was like, oh great. They’re doing a sign language. It’s probably not gonna be one. Saw it and I was like, oh my God, they did the research. Oh my God. And then finding out that it was a disabled deaf person who did it, that’s just like extra great, like yes, more like that content like, I would love that. So yeah, getting to, to bring that, I think into the, whether it’s the fantasy flight games or the fifth edition hack, either way I would love to work on both. Like, because I think that, that area, especially in the tabletop is kind of lacking just a little bit like and I think with all the new stuff coming out now, there’s a lot of like wiggle room there for all of these really cool ideas that you can bring into Star Wars through tabletop and, you know, validate more disabled people who love Star Wars, because as someone who is disabled and love Star Wars, I got loads of disabled friends who really love Star Wars, and it would be great if they could play people like them where the game, you know, actively encourages disabled people to be empowered in their stories would just be, yeah, fantastic.

Courtney: 

Yeah, absolutely. I feel like I could follow this train of thought with you for a really long time, but I don’t have the time to do that. So I am gonna pivot us because you know what, representation is so fucking important. And now I wanna talk about like, I wanna get into your strategies. You know, like I wanna know just all about like being a freelancer while you’re trying to balance your own disabilities and your own energy levels. And I mean, I wanna, I guess start with like, do you even have what you would call like a typical day or week? If so, what does that look like? Or is it just different all of the time, because life.

Sara: 

Yeah. I guess like my typical day is like I set myself around about six, six or seven hours to work. And make sure I take like a breaks. So like I’ll have like a proper, like half hour lunch break, but then I’ll have like a couple 10 minute breaks within those hours. Whether that’s like I get up and, you know, go play with the, the dogs for about 10 minutes or I play a video game for 10 minutes or read a book or whatever for 10 minutes to do that. But also when I, when I first started out, I had this real thing because it happened so quickly like that this snowball effect of getting to work on so many things that I felt I couldn’t say no. And I would take on loads of workloads and then force to work on them as long as I possibly could. You know, pulling all nighters when you’ve got chronic pain and chronic fatigue, not a good idea. It’s just surprisingly who would’ve known. But making sure you set those boundaries, not just for your employers, but also for yourself as a person, like being aware as well, that you’re not a bad person if you have to take a day off because of a chronic pain flare up and making sure you establish that communication with the people that you are working for or with because I had this really bad anxiety that if I so much as said I was struggling with my physical health, that I would be taken off the project because that is a real concern, disabled and chronically ill people have whether they’re working you know, like an everyday physical job or a desk job. You know, there’s that kind of worry that you’ll be seen as weaker and therefore not important to the project anymore. Which, you know, as long as you keep open communication with the people you’re working with, they are more than happy to make sure that, you know, you’ve got enough wiggle room. A lot of the time from experience working in the industry now is these projects like they’re being written and made like usually a year in advance of when the actual product needs to be finished and out by, so you taking a day or two or a week where you are really, you know, ill and struggling with your disability or mental health that, you know, there, there is more than enough wiggle room for you, as long as you can just tell people, you know, where you are at with stuff and be honest and have good communication with them. Yeah, like they’re more than more than willing to accommodate, and if they’re not, that kind of reflects really badly on them as people and company. So just, before I sign contracts and stuff is I’m like, I just wanna be clear that there might be days where I can’t work and things like that and make sure that they are aware that these days can just happen randomly. So it’s not like I can be like, oh, I’m not feeling too well today. So I might take tomorrow off if it’s like, it could be, or it couldn’t be, I could feel bad when I go to bed, but wake up fine. And then vice versa. So yeah, doing stuff like that, making sure as well I found is having two pill organizers now where I keep one downstairs by my computer and then one upstairs so that when I get up first thing in the morning, I take all my tablets down, but then come downstairs and I’ve got my tablets that normally I’ll need during those break times. So like, I’ll have them there. So I don’t have to, you know, put energy into getting up the stairs and, and things like that. And I’ve also made it a habit that because cooking can be really tiring as well. It’s like when I take those breaks, I usually have something instant for lunch. I’m pretty lucky that I still live at home at the minute. So like dinner: parents can sort out which is very nice and kind of them. But yeah, like stuff like lunch or breakfast is just usually quick things that I can either pick at while working or can easily get whilst I’m working or take a break. And yeah, it’s a lot of it comes down to like being kind to yourself and knowing your limitations and that having those limitations aren’t anything bad. Which was really hard for me to adjust to in the beginning. Because like I said, yeah, there’s that fear that like, if you turn down one project, suddenly no projects will come and it’s like, no, that’s not how it works. And if you have to say, I can’t do it this time, that doesn’t mean that company is never gonna talk to you ever again. it just means, okay, you weren’t a fit this time, but we’ll keep you in mind for future endeavors and stuff like that. So yeah. Just, just pacing yourself as well. Like, I won’t work with a specific goal in mind when I’m working on projects. Like if I’m writing an adventure, I’ll be like, I’ll be happy if I can get, if it’s a really bad like brain fog day, I’ll be like, I’m happy if I can, even if I don’t write anything, I’ll just be happy if I can just look things over and fix any glaring issues, like misspellings or word changes that need to happen. And I’ll be happy with that. So yeah. Even if it’s like, you suddenly get a flare up and that’s it, you can only work a half day is to not push yourself beyond what you feel you are capable and able to adjust to. Because you know, it could be a bad pain day, but I’ll be like, oh, I can just put my, my knee support on and then it should be fine. But some days it’s like, no, I’m gonna need to take my really strong pain medication, which is going to make me too tired to do anything. And if I write anything, it’ll come out as gibberish. So just be honest with yourself set you know, a good pace and basically adjust your work desk and like, or your workroom or whatever to best suit your needs. Like I have a hydraulic desk and my chair, is like an orthopedic gaming chair, so it’s, it’s as comfortable for me as it can possibly be. Without you know, taking up loads and loads of space or being something that like, you know, is, is a chair that I now permanently use rather than like switching chairs out and stuff. It’s like, it’s just more convenient to have one thing that works. But yeah, having stuff as well, like be as organized as you can get it is usually I say as my desk is currently a mess at the moment, but to be fair, I was working on just personal artwork. So like I just move stuff over to one side for now. But but yeah, usually like having it organized in a way that maybe it’s not, you know, the most sensible or sensical to other people, but if it works for you, like that’s great. And yeah, I can’t stress enough as well is either have like a physical calendar or a calendar on your PC or whatever that popups and gives you notifications of when things are due or not, because. One day you can be working and be like, yep. This is when the deadline is it’s tomorrow. And then tomorrow comes and you’ve got a really bad brain fog day and you’re walking around thinking I should have done something. What haven’t I done? And then, you know, you get an email the next day from work saying, Hey, where’s your project? And you’re like, oh crap. which I’ve done a couple times. especially when I was like first starting out. I know there’s no real like set answer because obviously everyone’s disability affects them differently and the adjustments they need will be vastly different to what I need. But I cannot stress enough that if you are incapable of doing something that day or to a specific deadline is be honest with yourself and your employer and just let them know. Be honest, like with yourself and don’t try and push yourself because you’ll make yourself feel worse. And you’ll probably make your flare up last longer. Which, yeah, I’ve never done that before. Um, No experience with that. But yeah, like just, be aware that, you know, it, it doesn’t reflect badly on you, if you can’t do something or are struggling to do something and yeah. Adjust, adjust your life and your work life around your personal needs, even if it’s only like you can work. I know I, I work around roughly six or seven hours a day, but someone else might only be able to work two to three hours a day and that’s fine. I’ve also found, like having interests directly outside of work as well. Like something that I can immediately come away from and like a work and immediately jump into if it’s, even if it’s just drawing or finishing a book or watching a TV show, having those things is really important as well. I, I know when people have jobs and stuff, they stress like, you know, self care’s important, but I feel like it’s doubly so if you’re disabled, chronically ill or neuro divergent because you often feel that pressure’s on you to kind of act quote unquote normal, like everyone else. And it, you, you can’t, and you shouldn’t have to pretend to and usually make things worse for yourself by pretending to be so, figure out what works for you. And if people unaccepting of that, that’s really on them and not you. And yeah again, like keep that open communication with employers. They’ll really appreciate the fact that you can just be honest with them and tell them that you know, you’re struggling with something and it might be that they can offer help or just even extend the deadline for you and put to, to rest like the worries that you may be having. It’s, it’s really not the end of the world. If you can’t meet something on time or if you have a flare up or something that happens completely, you know, at the drop of a hat, like I get. So yeah, your work life around your like disability and figure out what works best for you. And don’t feel that you have to compromise on that in any way or that you have to adjust to other people who may not understand what your experience is like. Yeah, that’s usually the, the kind of best advice I can really offer.

Courtney: 

I was identifying myself in a lot of things that you just said was like, Hmm. Yeah. That’s, that’s been a work in progress.

Sara: 

yeah.

Courtney: 

I just, I have to say like, personally that following like you and your advocacy over the, I mean, obviously you’ve been doing it for much longer, but like just, I found you maybe a year and a half ago or so and I was born disabled. I, and then I also like developed another chronic illness early last year, but I never really like accepted those things about myself. And so being able to see all of like the work that you’ve been doing and like just how much you’re advocating for like, Hey, there’s a spectrum was really helpful and beneficial for me personally. I just have to say like, you helped me get through like some of the shittiest times in my life last year cuz it was always this like, oh sure. I was born with this thing and like, sure, I I’ve got some limitations, but it’s like, but I’m, I’m not that I’m not disabled. Like I’m not enough, you know? Like there’s always that like, well, so many people have it worse than I do. And so. It’s just, it’s been a journey cuz you know, then like, oh Hey snap up your fingers. Like one day, oh I’m even worse than I was. Cool. How do I like get through this? And so like I personally wanna say thank you for just being such an advocate and for just putting so much like good discourse out there and all of these products and making it I don’t know, like it’s just, it’s a lot easier to accept and yeah. So I wanna start with saying thank you for that, but I’m curious like for you yourself, was there anything in particular or like any techniques or things that you’ve just kind of learned over the year that have helped you be more like accepting of yourself and like dealing with your own internalized ableism?

Sara: 

I feel like a lot of mine came about during university. And because kind of before that it was existing like. In spite of my disability rather than with it. So like that kind of, like you said, like, oh, but like other people have it worse, you know? And it’s like, that’s not how it works. you know, and it’s, it’s not, like you said, it’s not a monolith it’s, it’s that spectrum. And it kind of really opened my eyes to the fact that many people are disabled and either they don’t know it or feel like they can’t accept it because, you know, someone has it worse than me, which has been a really kind of thing that’s ingrained into people. A lot, like it, it just seems to be like a societal standard. where people like I’ve had experiences where my parents have been like, you know, oh, well you’re not in a wheelchair. So like, you know, it’s, it’s not that bad. And it’s like, I’m an adult now. And I I’m an ambulatory wheelchair user, you know, and that you, you end up denying yourself help that otherwise could have really aided you. And when I got to university and they were like, oh yeah. Because you have these health conditions you qualify as being a disabled student and here’s all like the, the things we can do for you. Like, we can give you a laptop to work on. And like my hydraulic desk came from my university that I got to keep and things like that and getting help with affording my books and affording getting to live on campus so that everything was more accessible to me. And I was like, wow. So this is what life could be like if like I actually just accepted it and kind of became less ashamed of it. And then also having the experiences of Playing tabletop. And getting to eventually when I made that realization, I was like, well, I wanna play a character who’s like me. And getting to play my first character, who was like me in the sense that they had osteoarthritis and getting to play that character, even though there was no like official rules or supplements on how to play that character, you know, getting to, to do that was really liberating. It was like super empowering. I was like, you know, I get to be a hero and I get to do all these cool things. I think, you know, that then it kind of hit me that I was like, tabletop needs more of that because I kind of kept getting hit with, oh, but there’s no rules for it. Or there’s no equipment for that. And I was like, I’ll go make it myself then. And then, you know, getting confident. As I got more confident with rulings and, and making those things and getting more invested in the tabletop community and realizing that there are a lot of disabled people out there who play tabletop, because it is one of the most accessible hobbies I feel like a person can have, regardless of whether they’re disabled or not. You know, you don’t even need dice anymore. You can just use an online dice roller and you can buy PDFs for way cheaper than the books actually are. So, you know, you can have them all stored on like one area or bring them on your phone to, to gaming tables and stuff. So, yeah. And then, you know, I kind of made connections with the, the community who were disabled in the tabletop community. So like a community within the community. And then that kind of grew out into, no, we need to like be doing more and holding, you know, companies accountable for the content that they put out, because I always thought it was ridiculous that people had to pay extra to like have these supplement books where disability was included and it’s like, that should be at the core of the game. People are also, you know, born disabled or have an accident or illness in childhood and then are disabled adults. Or in the case of like, when I first got into the Witcher, a character becomes disabled, but continues adventuring and has to adjust to that. And these games should be more representative of that. And I was kind of you know inspired by people like Jennifer Kretchmer and Sam Gamgee like over on Twitter and they’re talking about it. And I was like, yeah, I’m gonna learn more about this whilst, you know, I’m at university. I have all these books accessible to me, so I might as well learn more about it. And yeah, ended up kind of getting really passionate about it. And then that all, you know, spiraled into the combat wheelchair. And then the response to that, both good and bad. Like the good response made me feel like, yeah, like we should be doing more of this and it should be more normalized. And then the bad response I got to, it was me being like, yeah, well, no, I’m gonna make more of it because it will upset people like you. Which is, you know, I, I, I make the content for disabled people, but knowing that it upsets people who think disabled people don’t have a place in stories. Yeah. That’s, that’s really like, good. I feel good about that. Like you know, there’s, there’s that slight little bit of being petty about it, which is just nice. Yeah, so like getting to, my, my journey has kind of been entwined. I, I would guess. Or I guess I would put it with tabletop and tabletop has helped me learn more about not just my disabilities, but other people’s and their experiences. And it’s taught me how to capture those experiences within the content that I put out. And yeah, it’s, it’s kind of gone hand in hand for me and now I can’t, it’s not that I can’t enjoy TTRPG without disability, but now that that’s just become like a staple in TTRPG for me you know, where I’ll look at a TTRPG book and the first thing I’ll look for is, oh, is there like any disability rulings? And if there isn’t, how can I put them in? So yeah, you know, it’s, it’s kind of become. Something that I used to really hate about myself as a, as a 12 year old. And I’m now 25 and, you know, couldn’t care less. I don’t feel like any shame about my disability. I feel proud of my disability and the disabled community that, you know, the D&D and TTRPG community as a whole has, and seeing that their creations as well, like is always so inspiring, like seeing other people’s whether it be subclasses or mobility aids and stuff that they’ve made themselves is always like, so inspiring to see. And yeah, like my, my enjoyment of tabletop, a lot of it has come from accepting my disability. So for me, it’s it’s yeah, like tabletop means an awful lot because it helped me get a lot more comfortable with my disability and my. My identity is a person because even though disability, isn’t a person’s whole identity, it sure is a lot of it because it impacts every part of your life. Really. So, yeah. I got to, you know, accept me and I’ve grown more as a person, I would say since, you know, accepting that about myself.

Courtney: 

like, I honestly wish that I could keep talking to you for a very long time. But I do have to wind down. So Sarah, is there anything that we haven’t talked about yet that is coming up, that you’re working on, that you’re excited about, that you’re allowed to talk about?

Sara: 

Let’s see. There is some DLC in the future for the Witcher that I, I worked on which can’t be specific about, but once again, like kind of tackles disability and stuff like that. And the acknowledgement that, you know, in a, in a game setting and universe that is as gritty and as filled with danger as the Witcher, is that like their role should also reflect that. So yeah, getting to, to work on that was a lot of fun and I’m excited for when that comes out. I’m not sure when really, because there are a lot of DLCs that they put out for different games at the end of, I think it’s at the end of the month that they do it now. But yeah, like usually something gets put up for every game that they do. So getting to work on that was great. The combat wheelchair version four coming out sometime this year, because every time I’m like, yeah, this is everything that I wanna put in it. I’m like, I’m just gonna add a few extra things on Which is gonna include, like I said, with all the different mobility aids there’s feats now. One of those feats being a feat for spell casters with chronic pain and one for chronic fatigue there are also feats taken for blind combatant characters like blind fighters which gives you an ability because I really hate when people are like, oh, just have blind sense or tremor sense. And it’s like that’s not how it works. So I’ve met, you know, made a feat where basically you take time as part of your turn to listen out for movement. And when you can, you can pinpoint it down to where that person roughly is, and then you get an advantage bonus on your attack. And things like that, because that is far more reflective than just saying you have a magical sense which is not how it really works. And there’s also gonna be another catalog within the version for which is wheelchairs from like across different settings. So like ones that I designed. For settings like Barovia. That one’s called the Wolfsbane and it’s designed for fighting, you know lycanthropic monsters and vampires. And it’s got like a very kind of Victorian esque, steam punk vibe. And then there is one that is for icy terrain and snow terrains. So like if you’re playing a character in ice wind Dale you can play a character that has detachable and and clip-on-able sled skis and there’s even a breed of dog that I’m introducing called Marchy dogs. And they are basically like sled dogs specifically for these like wheelchairs that you know, give you like extra bonuses and stuff over like ice and snow and things like that. And there’s also gonna be ones for underwater and yeah, just like a whole, a whole variety for like different things. So that if you want to play in a very specific setting and Don’t want to go through every niche bit of like the core rulings, You can just get given a stat block for a specific type of wheelchair to make it easier for people who want to either use it as an NPC. And also for players who asked my character has a disability where they won’t need the chair very often, but like to have it as an option would be great. So I’ll be like, okay, here’s like a stat block now. And hopefully I’m still organizing a layout for a proper a proper like combat wheelchair leak track sheet, basically to go on with the character sheets where you can, you know, keep track of weight, what items you currently have on it. And if it needs any repairs and stuff, you can note it down on, on there and keep track of it a little easier. And. Yeah. I’m also gonna do a little help sheet as well on describing wheelchairs in combat and also for players as well. Basically uh, what can I do on my turn? But further the wheelchair where it says just briefly everything the wheelchair can do very roughly summed up. So they’ve got like a, a sheet that they can bring to the table because like me, I’ll just forget because brain fog, they’ll be like, I know that the chair has this very specific thing, but I can’t remember it right now. And it’ll break it down into, what’s an action, what’s a bonus action, what’s a reaction, and what’s a free action. And what’s to be aware of in combat. So yeah, there’s, there’s a lot of things that are being added to the fourth edition, and the most exciting thing about it is fingers crossed. It’s going to be print on demand so people can get a nice, fancy hardback or paperback version whichever they prefer. And I did mention as well because there was some concern on Twitter, but I did say it’s, it’s not the chair going up behind like a paywall or anything. It’ll still be completely free and accessible online in its PDF form. Which, you know, you can print or have on your computer. It’s just for people who like me would like a fancy, nice book to put on their shelves because I like collecting TTRPG books. even if it’s just supplement books. And so getting to, to do that but that will probably be sometime after the version four is out. Because that will allow me to make any changes and, you know, also getting extra art and stuff done for a published version of the book. Yeah, I am looking forward to it. I hope to have it out. I was hoping to have it out by summer, but like summer’s here now and it’s like, it’s probably not gonna be until either just before Christmas or like December month. I do hope, hope to have it out by the end of 2022 though, for sure. And yeah, like I’m just super looking forward to that. It’s one of the things that I’ve been working on in my spare time, like between all of my big work projects, and then after that, hopefully getting it into a print on demand format would be great. And yeah, who knows what the future holds, but yeah, I, I also plan if that happens is to, to do some conventions and stuff like tabletop conventions and stuff, and talk about it more there and yeah. Do do more advocacy work and stuff like that. So there, there are plans with that. And yeah, I think that’s everything that I can kind of talk about unfortunately. But the biggest one really is the, the version four of the combat wheelchair. I mean, I’m pretty open about where I am with it on Twitter. Like I’m always talking about, I mean the other day I released what the front cover looks like for version four, which is Talon, my D&D character, using a grappling hook to climb up a wall using his wheelchair which was done by crew and Lio he is amazing and has done the artwork for ever since version two, I think cuz version one didn’t really have official artwork or anything, but Lio has done all of the artwork since. So it was really nice to have him come back and do another piece and it looks really cool and I’m really happy with it. And Talon, even in the image, has got like an upgraded wheelchair to show the progression of like each version to reflect what the chairs now look like, which has been great and a lot of fun. And yeah, I’m just really excited about version four and seeing what people make of it when it comes out.

Courtney: 

Okay. I am a hundred percent buying that book when it’s available in book form and, yeah, just, just a few things going on.

Sara: 

Just a few

Courtney: 

That’s amazing. So Sarah, if people want to find you, find all of this super cool work that you are doing where should they go?

Sara: 

Twitter pretty much for all my announcements and everything. And sometimes me either screaming and or crying about the Witcher or Star Wars in some way like I’ve not been posting spoilers, but the Kenobi TV show has got me feel in some kind of way. Very emotional every week. Yeah. That’s like one meme where it’s like from the office where it’s like, yep. I’m prepared to get hurt again. Like literally every morning when it’s on, I’m just like, yeah. Prepared to go through the emotional wreck that this episode will bring. So my Twitter is Mustangsart and I’m pretty much Mustangsart everywhere else. So my Patreon, my Ko-fi and my Instagram, which my Instagram is only for really posting pictures of my dogs. So if you’re interested in seeing two miniature doxens, one called Colin and one called Darcy. Yeah, my Instagram’s for that, but yeah. So with Patreon with the rewards and stuff, you usually either get early access to a lot of the combat wheelchair stuff before it gets put out to the public or just stuff that I’m working on in my spare time, like stuff coming out this month, there is some free stuff. So you don’t even need to buy a tier there’s some, some free fiction, which is about a disabled Witcher with a prosthetic arm. And it’s about him and hunting a bruxa, which has been a lot of fun to write. Then there is the two ancestry for D&D fifth edition, one being a vampire and another being a half vampire, a dampyr. And those are going to be tier exclusives. And I think as well for 10 pound plus tier this month is they’re getting a look at the current state of the version for manuscript, which good luck to them. It’s a hundred pages long, and I am so sorry for how long it is. And it doesn’t even contain everything that’s gonna be in it yet. But yeah, it’s, it’s all been it’s, it’s all on there. And you’ll also have access to everything that’s been on there. The second you buy a specific tier or you’ll have everything from that tier that I’ve ever posted over the past year or so. Yeah, so that’s kind of where you can find everything. Again, Pretty much Twitter is where I do my, all of my announcements, just because it’s the most accessible I’ve found, especially for tabletop. It seems to be where a lot of the community is based. So yeah. Just Twitter, which is again, Mustangsart

Courtney: 

Awesome. Yeah, I will have links to that in the show notes. Thank you so much for coming on today. This has been a real privilege to be able to talk with you and just interrogate you about all of the things.

Sara: 

No problem. It was really nice. Like, yeah. I love coming on and just like chatting with people who like tabletop and just wanna talk about tabletop. It’s always fun. So yeah, just getting to talk about it is just fun. Like in, in any regard, whether it be about disability or even if it’s only just lightly touching on disability, it’s just, yeah, a lot of fun to talk about.

Thanks for dropping by! We would love to know who would like us to interview, so please drop a comment here on the blog, on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or Discord to let us know who your favorite creators are! If you’d like access to more maps and content, including downloadable PDFs of our adventures, check out our Maps Patreon or Podcast Patreon. We’re able to do what we do because of all our amazing Patrons!

Recent Episodes

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *